Feb 17, 2018, 21:09

In Memory of Gary Tarpley

In Memory of

Gary Tarpley

 
January 17, 1940 - January 31, 2018
 

Gary Tarpley, 78, passed away January 31, 2018 in Arlington. 
In lieu of flowers donations can be made to The Brain & Neurological Treatment Foundation. P.O. Box 174006, Arlington, TX 76003. www.BNTFoundation.org 
Gary was born January 17, 1940 in Fort Worth. He retired in 2002 as Major (Regional Commander) for the Fort Worth region of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. After retirement, he worked for the Dallas County Sheriff's Department. 
Gary was preceded in death by his parents, Ed and Florence Tarpley.
He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Dianne; daughters, Alicia Fife and husband Dale, Allison Moore and husband Chad; grandchildren, Dylan, Summer, Jadyn, Channing, Cassidy; sister Sally Ladd; and extended family.

Fish and Game welcomes new K9 officer

The newest member of the state Fish and Game Department definitely will work for food.
 
Cora the black Lab and her handler, Conservation Officer James Benvenuti, recently completed a six-week training and certification program at Vermont Criminal Justice Training Center. They’ve been training together since last fall, and this was the final step in becoming a certified team.
 
“She’s ready to go to work,” Benvenuti said.
 
Cora and Benvenuti, who are based out of the Region 3 office in Durham, are now certified in evidence/article detection (finding objects that contain human scent as well as shell casings and gunpowder), fish and wildlife detection (fish, venison and turkey) and tracking.
Benvenuti said his 13-month-old dog excels at fish detection. Cora has already been on the job, checking fishermen’s coolers at boat launches, where she’s been “well received,” he said.

Click here to read the entire story.

Conservation Officer James Benvenuti and his dog Cora are the newest addition to Fish and Game's K9 Conservation Corps. (Courtesy/Bri Benvenuti)

 

Texas Game Wardens Aid in Houston Area Flood Response

HOUSTON – Texas game wardens have been busy responding to devastating floods that inundated a dozen southeast Texas counties over the last few days, conducting over 170 water rescues of individuals and families who were caught in the quickly rising waters.

“The Texas game wardens’ knowledge of the waterways and back country areas have allowed them to quickly locate and rescue those who have been trapped by the floods ,” said Texas Game Warden Maj. William Skeen. “Conditions out there have been difficult, but I’m very proud of the efforts by our game wardens, they have saved many lives. Regardless of how dangerous it is, our men and women will stay engaged with local communities and state response efforts until this event is over."

Wardens were dispatched in all affected counties, including: Palo Pinto, Parker, Johnson, Harris, Waller, Austin, Montgomery, Grimes, Fayette, Colorado, Falls and Milam. In addition to water rescues, wardens conducted 78 evacuations, rescued 27 pets, 240 welfare checks and assisted in the recovery of one fatality in Waller County.

For over 100 years, Texas Game Wardens have provided professional law enforcement, search and rescue and water safety while working to conserve and protect our natural resources. Texas Game Wardens respond locally to natural disasters and also operate a statewide search and rescue team. Game wardens also work closely with the Texas Division of Emergency Management during large-scale disasters.

Texas Game Wardens Aid in Houston Area Flood Response

HOUSTON – Texas game wardens have been busy responding to devastating floods that inundated a dozen southeast Texas counties over the last few days, conducting over 170 water rescues of individuals and families who were caught in the quickly rising waters.

“The Texas game wardens’ knowledge of the waterways and back country areas have allowed them to quickly locate and rescue those who have been trapped by the floods ,” said Texas Game Warden Maj. William Skeen. “Conditions out there have been difficult, but I’m very proud of the efforts by our game wardens, they have saved many lives. Regardless of how dangerous it is, our men and women will stay engaged with local communities and state response efforts until this event is over."

Wardens were dispatched in all affected counties, including: Palo Pinto, Parker, Johnson, Harris, Waller, Austin, Montgomery, Grimes, Fayette, Colorado, Falls and Milam. In addition to water rescues, wardens conducted 78 evacuations, rescued 27 pets, 240 welfare checks and assisted in the recovery of one fatality in Waller County.

For over 100 years, Texas Game Wardens have provided professional law enforcement, search and rescue and water safety while working to conserve and protect our natural resources. Texas Game Wardens respond locally to natural disasters and also operate a statewide search and rescue team. Game wardens also work closely with the Texas Division of Emergency Management during large-scale disasters.

Fish and Game welcomes new K9 officer

The newest member of the state Fish and Game Department definitely will work for food.
 
Cora the black Lab and her handler, Conservation Officer James Benvenuti, recently completed a six-week training and certification program at Vermont Criminal Justice Training Center. They’ve been training together since last fall, and this was the final step in becoming a certified team.
 
“She’s ready to go to work,” Benvenuti said.
 
Cora and Benvenuti, who are based out of the Region 3 office in Durham, are now certified in evidence/article detection (finding objects that contain human scent as well as shell casings and gunpowder), fish and wildlife detection (fish, venison and turkey) and tracking.
Benvenuti said his 13-month-old dog excels at fish detection. Cora has already been on the job, checking fishermen’s coolers at boat launches, where she’s been “well received,” he said.

Click here to read the entire story.

Conservation Officer James Benvenuti and his dog Cora are the newest addition to Fish and Game's K9 Conservation Corps. (Courtesy/Bri Benvenuti)

 

DEC officer who saved her partner's life no stranger to 'heroic' feats

Bobseine162 (003).jpg

Lt. Liza Bobseine, right, and DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos who issued a statement last week lauding Bonseine for her "quick and heroic actions" that he said saved the life of her shot partner. (DEC)

The state environmental conservation officer credited with saving the life of her partner who got shot while the two were investigating a complaint of illegal deer hunting last week in Columbia County has been lauded before for outstanding actions on the job.

In 2011, Lt. Liza Bobseine was named "Officer of the Year" by the New York State Rifle and Pistol Association for her role in hunting education and ensuring safe firearms use. A week after receiving the award, Bobseine was credited with saving the life of a 66-year-old woman who was sitting in her car in a parking lot and had stopped breathing, according to the East Hampton Patch newspaper.

Click here to read the entire story.

Felony poaching charges over 6x6 Elko county elk

Poached elk

ELKO — The Elko County District Attorney’s office has filed criminal complaints against three Utah residents in the poaching of a bull and a cow elk in northeastern Elko County in October 2015. The charges resulted from a year-long investigation by Nevada Department of Wildlife and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources game wardens and investigators. NDOW game wardens witnessed the killing of a large bull elk at a time when there were no mature bull elk seasons open in the area. Wardens later contacted Amy Jo Summers, who had the Nevada elk, but she only held a Utah bull elk tag.

Click here to read the entire story.

Seven Men Plead Guilty for Illegally Harvesting and Selling American Eels

Between the dates of October 4 and October 6, seven individuals pleaded guilty in Federal District Court in Portland, Maine, to trafficking more than $1.9 million worth of juvenile American eels, also known as “elvers,” in violation of the Lacey Act.

Yarann Im, Mark Green, John Pinkham, Thomas Reno, Michael Bryant and George Anestis each pleaded guilty to selling or transporting elvers in interstate commerce, that they had harvested illegally, or knew had been harvested illegally, in various East Coast states, including Virginia, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, among others.  Thomas Choi pleaded guilty to exporting elvers that he knew had been harvested illegally in New Jersey, Massachusetts, and elsewhere.

The guilty pleas were announced today by Assistant Attorney General John C. Cruden for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division and Director Dan Ashe of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).  The pleas were the result of “Operation Broken Glass,” a multi-jurisdiction USFWS investigation into the illegal trafficking of American eels.

 

Read the entire story by clicking here.

Retired RCMP officer accused of smuggling narwhal tusk pleads guilty in U.S.

A trailer used in smuggling narwhal tusks is displayed by wildlife enforcement officers from Enviroment Canada in Dartmouth, N.S., in 2013. Gregory Logan from New Brunswick pleaded guilty in the U.S. to a smuggling case.

A trailer used in smuggling narwhal tusks is displayed by wildlife enforcement officers from Environment Canada in Dartmouth, N.S., in 2013. Gregory Logan from New Brunswick pleaded guilty in the U.S. to a smuggling case.

  (Andrew Vaughan / THE CANADIAN PRESS file photo)  

BANGOR, MAINE—A retired RCMP officer accused of smuggling narwhal tusks across the border pleaded guilty Wednesday in a U.S. court to 10 money-laundering counts. Prosecutors said Gregory Logan, 59, of Saint John, N.B., smuggled 250 tusks valued at $1.5 million to $3 million into Maine in false compartments in his vehicle. Narwhals are medium-sized whales known for spiral tusks that can grow longer than 2.5 metres. They are protected by the U.S. and Canada.

Read the entire story by clicking here.